Videos

Think you know what tobacco costs? Using dip, cigarettes, or vapes comes at a cost that is more than just financial. Watch these videos to see what we mean.

  • vape epidemic

    Vaping is an epidemic spreading amongst teenagers. It can expose your lungs to acrolein, which can cause irreversible damage.

    SEE WHAT OTHER CHEMICALS ARE HIDING IN YOUR VAPE.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file.
    VOICEOVER: A teenage girl is sitting in her room at her desk doing homework. The camera slowly zooms towards her as we see what looks like veins protruding out of her face, moving and lingering near the surface of her skin. Quick cut into her body to see the inside of her lungs. There are creatures floating around and landing in her lungs.
    SCRIPT: There is an epidemic spreading. It can expose your lungs to acrolein, which can cause irreversible damage. It’s not a parasite. Not a virus. It’s vaping.
    The creatures have now filled the screen and transitioned into a yellow-liquid space where there are millions of them. The camera quickly zooms out to reveal the yellow liquid is actually vape juice in a vape pod. The pod then gets picked up by the teenager and clicked into her vape. 
    She takes a hit of the vape as we see something moving and lingering just under her skin again, which we can now understand are the chemicals of vaping going into her body. 
    We see the creatures in the yellow liquid take over the screen, followed by a black screen with The Real Cost logo appearing and the URL: WhatsInAVape.com.

  • Straw City

    Once upon a time, there was a Big Bad Wolf––but he smoked as a teen, stunting his lungs and ruining his perfect fairy-tale ending.

    Check out how smoking affects your potential.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file.

    The big bad wolf walks around a town with buildings made of straw. Scared pigs scream and run away as he passes. The wolf approaches a dress shop as a pig trying on her wedding dress shrieks in fear. The wolf huffs and puffs but cannot blow the building down.

    Female Voiceover: Smoking as a teen can permanently stunt your lungs, taking the air out of even the biggest and baddest.

    The wolf gives up disappointedly and pulls out a pack of cigarettes. The wolf has lost all power and the pigs are no longer afraid of him.

    Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, TheRealCost.gov, FDA logo.

    For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Delivery

    Not all surprises are fun. When you smoke, you could very well end up with an unexpected delivery you’ll wish you could return (Watts & Addy 2001).

    See the smoking consequences you can’t hide from.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. We see a teen smoking in an empty basketball court at night. A van pulls up, and a delivery man with a package exits the car and walks towards the teen. Delivery Man: Package for James Meiser. The teen reluctantly accepts the package. He opens up the box and finds a hideously stained set of teeth. Male Voiceover: Once you start smoking, the consequences will find you. The teen is visibly disgusted. He turns to look at the delivery man, but finds that he has mysteriously disappeared. He looks back down at the box, and the set of teeth have disappeared as well, only to turn up in the teen’s mouth, much to his dismay. Male Voiceover: Cigarettes may leave you with stained teeth, gum disease, and more. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, TheRealCost.gov, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Face of Dip

    Chances are the last things on your mind are mouth cancer and facial disfigurement. It’s hard to believe it could all start with a can of dip.

    Find out how dip is harmful to your health.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A young man looks at his cancer-disfigured mouth in the mirror. Voiceover: When you see yourself like that, it’s hard to believe that it all began with a can of dip. But then you start to look back. Video description: Cut to boy in the past. He looks younger and pulls a tooth out of his mouth. Voiceover: When your teeth started getting loose. Video description: He looks younger. He touches his jaw and gives a grimace of pain. Voiceover: When you ignored the signs. Video description: He looks even younger. He sees white patches in his mouth in the mirror. Voiceover:  When you thought white patches were no big deal.

    Video description: Now he looks much younger. He checks himself in the mirror. A can of dip sits on top of the sink. Voiceover: When you believed a can of dip could do no harm. Video description: His face turns again into the young man with the mouth disfigured. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Jeans

    A can of dip can leave a mark on your jeans, but dip can also leave a more disfiguring mark on your face, in the form of mouth cancer.

    Learn about how dip is harmful to your health.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A pair of worn jeans is hanging over a chair in a teenage boy’s bedroom. Cut to height measure chart on the wall and medals on a desk. Baseball game is playing on TV. Cut to worn jeans hanging over a chair. Camera creeps to the ring on jeans back pocket left by a can of dip. Voiceover: Dip doesn’t just leave a mark on your jeans.

    Video description: Circle on pocket turns into scar on the face of a man. Cut to man’s face disfigured by cancer. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Text is displayed: Gruen VonBehrens started dipping at age 13.

    He was diagnosed with mouth cancer at age 17. He died at 38. Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Stay in Control

    This is a time when you’re gaining control of your life and finally making your own decisions. Do you really want to give up your newfound freedom to smoking? Symptoms of addiction can start after just a few cigarettes for some teens.

    Learn more about how to stay in charge of your own life.

  • Pounds

    Dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals. If you start dipping as a teenager, in 10 years you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your entire body weight. That’s a pile of things to think about.

    Learn about the harmful chemicals that can be found in dip.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A boy is standing on a field. He opens a can of dip and pours dip on a wheelbarrow.  Voiceover: If you start dipping when you are a teenager . . . Video description: He opens more cans and dumps more dip on the wheelbarrow. Voiceover: . . . In 10 years, you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your entire body weight. Video description: A pile of dip begins to grow. Voiceover:  If you don’t think that can hurt you. Just think, dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals. Video description: The boy looks into camera. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Video description: He dumps the pile of dip.

    Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Football Practice

    Dip can take control and take your head out of the game.

    See how dip can make you lose control.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A teenage boy football player walks toward the bleachers. A monster hits the boy then drags him to the ground.

    Voiceover: Once you start to dip . . . it’s easy to lose control . . . Video description: The monster throws boy into the air and against the bleachers.

    Voiceover: . . . because dip makes you want more and more. Until the only choice you have . . . is to feed the monster. Again . . . and again. Taking more of your freedom away. Every day. Video description: The monster stuffs the boy’s mouth with dip.  Voiceover: Don’t let dip own you. Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Movie Date

    Once dip takes control, it doesn’t care what you might be missing out on.

    Learn how dip can make you lose control.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A teenage couple sits side by side in the cinema. A monster’s tentacles grab the boy’s leg. Voiceover: Once you start to dip . . . be prepared to get hooked. Video description: The boy drops the popcorn bucket. The monster clenches the boy. The boy tries to escape. Voiceover: It doesn’t matter where you are . . . The monster doesn’t care what you end up missing. Video description: The monster stuffs the boy’s mouth with dip. His date gets upset. Voiceover: Don’t let dip own you. Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Hacked

    When you vape, you could be delivering nicotine to your brain. Before you know it, the reprogramming begins and all you can think about is vaping again.
    Find out what happens when your brain gets hacked.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file.
    We see a teen skateboarding, another bowling, and another at a diner with friends. Every teen has a USB port where their mouth should be.
    A female teen with a USB port for a mouth walks out a door into a dark alley. She sticks a USB in her mouth and a close-up of her eyes shows they are flickering, like she is being hacked.
    Male Voiceover: Vaping can deliver nicotine to your brain, reprogramming you to crave more and more.
    Her friend beckons to her from the door, signaling for her to come back inside.
    Male Voiceover: Don’t get hacked.
    Text is displayed: Don’t get hacked by vaping, The Real Cost logo, FDA logo, Paid for by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration

  • Cold Hard Facts: Lungs

    Fact: When it comes to your lungs, the effects of smoking include both immediate and long-term damage.

    Learn more about the effects of smoking.

    A table is placed down with an emoji of a healthy pair of pink lungs on it.

    Voiceover: For one, smoking can cause both immediate and long-term damage. The chemicals in cigarette smoke reach your lungs quickly every time you inhale. Your blood then carries the toxic chemicals to every organ in your body. 

    Four hands place down four phones next to the tablet. Each phone has a different healthy organ on them. The lungs start to glitch. Four arrows appear pointing the flitching lungs to each phone with an organ on it. Each organ starts to glitch.

    Voiceover: Smoking can damage and destroy cilia – the tiny hairs that line your airways and sweep out mucus and dirt to keep your lungs clear. Once you lose enough cilia from smoking, you get “smokers’ cough.”  

    The tablet is removed. All the screens go black. The four phones now show different screens. The top phone on the left and the bottom phone on the right show cigarette smoke. The other two opposite phones show lung cilia. Two more phones in between these are added. One has destroyed cilia and one has more cigarette smoke. The smoke keeps going through the phones. The cilia phones are removed. All of the smoke phones are moved to the side and the table is put down with a drawing of a person. The person starts coughing and the drawing moves along with these coughs.

    Voiceover: Teens who smoke can develop smaller, weaker lungs that never grow to their potential size and never perform at maximum capacity. If your lungs can’t perform to full capacity, you can’t either. And the effects on lungs don’t stop there.

    The person is replaced with a drawing of lungs. The lungs look like the low battery sign on a phone. The lungs have a small part of red at the bottom and the lightning bolt power sign with the iPhone charge cable underneath to show that they need to be charged. The red flashes in the lungs. The lungs are filled up with red. The tablet is removed. The table is placed down with pictures of tiny healthy pink emoji lungs.

    Voiceover: Of every 100 lung cancer deaths, over 80 are the result of smoking. Cigarette smokers are up to 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than nonsmokers. 80 of the lungs are covered with cigarette smoke and turn a dark purple. “20X” appear on screen over the damaged lungs.

    Voiceover: Here’s the good news. If you stay away from cigarettes, you can save your lungs from the deadly effects of smoking.A hand comes in and swipes the table screen. A finger clicks and a pair of healthy pink emoji lungs next to a dirty cigarette pack shows up. The cigarette pack shakes and disappears. The lungs go to the center of the screen.

  • Cold Hard Facts: Addiction

    Fact: Smoking cigarettes can lead to nicotine addiction. Nicotine can change your brain, causing you to crave more and more nicotine. 

    Find out more about nicotine and addiction.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file.

    Voiceover: A lot of teens underestimate the power of nicotine–but it’s a highly addictive chemical in cigarettes that can literally change the way your brain works. Causing you to crave more and more nicotine.

    A crumpled-up piece of paper is unrumpled into a brain. A hand places a phone with gears on the screen over the brain. Three more phones all with gears on the screen are placed over the brain. A hand touches each phone and the gears become a cigarette pack with a fact calling the phone with the caller ID “NICOTINE.” The hand also has a wristband with nicotine on it.

    Voiceover: Modern cigarettes are designed to deliver nicotine more quickly to the user, making them even more addictive. And menthol cigarettes may be even harder to quit than other cigarettes.

    The phones are swiped off the brain. The brain goes out of focus and a spaceship with “nicotine on it” zooms throughout the screen. The spaceship sticks in the brain. The brain is replaced with a tablet with “1” on the screen. The hands place the table down and numbers counting up come onto the screen.

    Voiceover: It takes as little as one cigarette a month for some teens to develop symptoms of addiction. And, because of addiction, 3 out of 4 teens who smoke will continue to smoke as adults even if they want to quit.

    The screen now has four stick figures in red with smoke in the background. Three of the figures are together and one is apart. A cloud of smoke changes the lone figure green and it is plucked off the screen.

    Voiceover: It’s your life. You should be in control, not tobacco.

    The tablet is replaced by the hand with a green stick figure made out of paper on the table.

Cold Hard Facts: Addiction

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  • Hoffman AC, Miceli D. Menthol cigarettes and smoking cessation behavior. Tobacco Induced Diseases. 2011; 9(Suppl 1):S6: 1-5

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  • Hoffman AC, Simmons D. Menthol cigarette smoking and nicotine dependence. Tobacco Induced Diseases. 2011; 9(Suppl 1):S5:1-5.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults. We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

    Ursprung WW, DiFranza JR. The loss of autonomy over smoking in relation to lifetime cigarette consumption. Addictive Behaviors. 2010;35(1):14-18.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). Preventing Tobacco Use Among Youth and Young Adults (Fact Sheet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2004.

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Cold Hard Facts: Lungs

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults. We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

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Face of Dip

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

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Football Practice

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010.

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Hacked

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults. We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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Jeans

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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  • Shah JP, Gil Z. Current concepts in management of oral cancer–surgery. Oral Oncology. 2009; 45(4):394-401.

Pounds

Stay in Control

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    0011, 0050
  • Ursprung WW, DiFranza JR. The loss of autonomy over smoking in relation to lifetime cigarette consumption. Addictive Behaviors. 2010;35(1):14-18.

    0011, 0050

Straw City

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults. We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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vape epidemic

  • Goniewicz ML, Knysak J, Gawron M, et al. Levels of selected carcinogens and toxicants in vapour from electronic cigarettes. Tobacco Control. 2014; 23(2):133-139.

  • Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA).. Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health Administration. https://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS.... Accessed May 8, 2018.

Video Page Intro

  • Doubeni CA, Reed G, DiFranza JR. Early course of nicotine dependence in adolescent smokers. Pediatrics. 2010;125(6):1127-1133.

    0011, 0050
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Federal Register. 2012; 77(64): 20034-20037.

  • Ursprung WW, DiFranza JR. The loss of autonomy over smoking in relation to lifetime cigarette consumption. Addictive Behaviors. 2010;35(1):14-18.

    0011, 0050
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1988. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

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