Videos

Think you know what tobacco costs? Using dip, cigarettes, or vapes comes at a cost that is more than just financial. Watch these videos to see what we mean.

  • Face of Dip

    Chances are the last things on your mind are mouth cancer and facial disfigurement. It’s hard to believe it could all start with a can of dip.

    Find out how dip is harmful to your health.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A young man looks at his cancer-disfigured mouth in the mirror. Voiceover: When you see yourself like that, it’s hard to believe that it all began with a can of dip. But then you start to look back. Video description: Cut to boy in the past. He looks younger and pulls a tooth out of his mouth. Voiceover: When your teeth started getting loose. Video description: He looks younger. He touches his jaw and gives a grimace of pain. Voiceover: When you ignored the signs. Video description: He looks even younger. He sees white patches in his mouth in the mirror. Voiceover:  When you thought white patches were no big deal.

    Video description: Now he looks much younger. He checks himself in the mirror. A can of dip sits on top of the sink. Voiceover: When you believed a can of dip could do no harm. Video description: His face turns again into the young man with the mouth disfigured. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Jeans

    A can of dip can leave a mark on your jeans, but dip can also leave a more disfiguring mark on your face, in the form of mouth cancer.

    Learn about how dip is harmful to your health.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A pair of worn jeans is hanging over a chair in a teenage boy’s bedroom. Cut to height measure chart on the wall and medals on a desk. Baseball game is playing on TV. Cut to worn jeans hanging over a chair. Camera creeps to the ring on jeans back pocket left by a can of dip. Voiceover: Dip doesn’t just leave a mark on your jeans.

    Video description: Circle on pocket turns into scar on the face of a man. Cut to man’s face disfigured by cancer. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Text is displayed: Gruen VonBehrens started dipping at age 13.

    He was diagnosed with mouth cancer at age 17. He died at 38. Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Football Practice

    Dip can take control and take your head out of the game.

    See how dip can make you lose control.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A teenage boy football player walks toward the bleachers. A monster hits the boy then drags him to the ground.

    Voiceover: Once you start to dip . . . it’s easy to lose control . . . Video description: The monster throws boy into the air and against the bleachers.

    Voiceover: . . . because dip makes you want more and more. Until the only choice you have . . . is to feed the monster. Again . . . and again. Taking more of your freedom away. Every day. Video description: The monster stuffs the boy’s mouth with dip.  Voiceover: Don’t let dip own you. Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Movie Date

    Once dip takes control, it doesn’t care what you might be missing out on.

    Learn how dip can make you lose control.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A teenage couple sits side by side in the cinema. A monster’s tentacles grab the boy’s leg. Voiceover: Once you start to dip . . . be prepared to get hooked. Video description: The boy drops the popcorn bucket. The monster clenches the boy. The boy tries to escape. Voiceover: It doesn’t matter where you are . . . The monster doesn’t care what you end up missing. Video description: The monster stuffs the boy’s mouth with dip. His date gets upset. Voiceover: Don’t let dip own you. Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Straw City

    Once upon a time, there was a Big Bad Wolf––but he smoked as a teen, stunting his lungs and ruining his perfect fairy-tale ending.

    Check out how smoking affects your potential.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file.

    The big bad wolf walks around a town with buildings made of straw. Scared pigs scream and run away as he passes. The wolf approaches a dress shop as a pig trying on her wedding dress shrieks in fear. The wolf huffs and puffs but cannot blow the building down.

    Female Voiceover: Smoking as a teen can permanently stunt your lungs, taking the air out of even the biggest and baddest.

    The wolf gives up disappointedly and pulls out a pack of cigarettes. The wolf has lost all power and the pigs are no longer afraid of him.

    Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, TheRealCost.gov, FDA logo.

    For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Delivery

    Not all surprises are fun. When you smoke, you could very well end up with an unexpected delivery you’ll wish you could return (Watts & Addy 2001).

    See the smoking consequences you can’t hide from.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. We see a teen smoking in an empty basketball court at night. A van pulls up, and a delivery man with a package exits the car and walks towards the teen. Delivery Man: Package for James Meiser. The teen reluctantly accepts the package. He opens up the box and finds a hideously stained set of teeth. Male Voiceover: Once you start smoking, the consequences will find you. The teen is visibly disgusted. He turns to look at the delivery man, but finds that he has mysteriously disappeared. He looks back down at the box, and the set of teeth have disappeared as well, only to turn up in the teen’s mouth, much to his dismay. Male Voiceover: Cigarettes may leave you with stained teeth, gum disease, and more. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, TheRealCost.gov, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

  • Stay in Control

    This is a time when you’re gaining control of your life and finally making your own decisions. Do you really want to give up your newfound freedom to smoking? Symptoms of addiction can start after just a few cigarettes for some teens.

    Learn more about how to stay in charge of your own life.

  • Mandibulectomy

    If diagnosed with mouth cancer, it can require a mandibulectomy, the removal of part or all of your jaw.

    DISCOVER THE CONSEQUENCES OF DIPPING.

    People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. We see a teenage boy open a laptop, from the point of view of the laptop. A search bar appears on the screen, so we see what the boy types into the online search, but we don’t see what he sees as the result. He types: What is a mandibulectomy? Suddenly, we catch a glimpse of the mandibulectomy operation, but we don’t see it for long enough. We just see the boys scare reaction. He does not want to see more. Type on the screen appears: Can using dip lead to mouth cancer and jaw removal? Don’t search it. We see another quick glimpse of the brutal operation. We see the Real Cost logo.

Face of Dip

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

  • Secretan B, Straif K, Baan R, et al. A review of human carcinogens—Part E: tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salted fish. The Lancet Oncology. 2009; 10(11): 1033-1034.

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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Football Practice

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010.

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Jeans

  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults: A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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  • Shah JP, Gil Z. Current concepts in management of oral cancer–surgery. Oral Oncology. 2009; 45(4):394-401.

Mandibulectomy

  • Secretan B, Straif K, Baan R, et al. A review of human carcinogens—Part E: tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salted fish. The Lancet Oncology. 2009; 10(11): 1033-1034.

    0036, 0037
  • Shah JP, Gil Z. Current concepts in management of oral cancer–surgery. Oral Oncology. 2009; 45(4):394-401.

Stay in Control

  • Doubeni CA, Reed G, DiFranza JR. Early course of nicotine dependence in adolescent smokers. Pediatrics. 2010;125(6):1127-1133.

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  • Ursprung WW, DiFranza JR. The loss of autonomy over smoking in relation to lifetime cigarette consumption. Addictive Behaviors. 2010;35(1):14-18.

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Straw City

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: Preventing Tobacco Use among Youth and Young Adults. We Can Make the Next Generation Tobacco-Free (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2012.

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Video Page Intro

  • Doubeni CA, Reed G, DiFranza JR. Early course of nicotine dependence in adolescent smokers. Pediatrics. 2010;125(6):1127-1133.

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  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Federal Register. 2012; 77(64): 20034-20037.

  • Ursprung WW, DiFranza JR. The loss of autonomy over smoking in relation to lifetime cigarette consumption. Addictive Behaviors. 2010;35(1):14-18.

    0011, 0050
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1988. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

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