Tobacco Basics

> Arsenic

Image of dying insect

ARSENIC: Found in pesticides and dip

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> Dangerous Chemicals In All Tobacco Products

All tobacco products contain dangerous chemicals. Not just cigarettes
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Dip - Tobacco Basics Quiz

Congrats - Quiz

CONGRATS!

You've completed all the quiz questions.

How'd you do? If you're trying to make up your mind about tobacco, it's good to know the facts.

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> Lead

Image of lead-based paint peeling from wall

LEAD: Found in old paint and dip

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> Formaldehyde

Dead frog preserved in a jar with formaldehyde

Dip can contain formaldehyde, which is used to preserve dead bodies

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> Dip Contains Up to 30 Cancer-Causing Chemicals

If you don’t think dip can hurt you, just think, dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals.
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What's in a pinch?

So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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So what’s in a pinch of dip?  (image of fingers pinching dip)
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> Yeast, Mold, and Bacteria

a picture of mold growing on a slice of toast

Yeast. Mold. Bacteria. Just a few of the nasty things that can be found in dip

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Pounds

People using screen readers may not be able to fully view information in this file. Video description: A boy is standing on a field. He opens a can of dip and pours dip on a wheelbarrow.  Voiceover: If you start dipping when you are a teenager . . . Video description: He opens more cans and dumps more dip on the wheelbarrow. Voiceover: . . . In 10 years, you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your entire body weight. Video description: A pile of dip begins to grow. Voiceover:  If you don’t think that can hurt you. Just think, dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals. Video description: The boy looks into camera. Voiceover: Dip can cause mouth cancer. Video description: He dumps the pile of dip.

Voiceover: Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless. Text is displayed: The Real Cost logo, Smokeless doesn’t mean harmless, FDA logo. For any more help, please email tobaccocampaigns@fda.hhs.gov.

Dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals. If you start dipping as a teenager, in 10 years you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your entire body weight. That’s a pile of things to think about.

Learn about the harmful chemicals that can be found in dip.

If you don’t think dip can hurt you, just think, dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals

No Safe Tobacco

No Safe Tobacco

You know that cigarettes are bad for you, but did you know that all tobacco contains toxic, cancer-causing chemicals?

That is because some of the harmful chemicals occur naturally in the tobacco plant while others are absorbed from the soil and fertilizers around the plant.|page|

No Safe Tobacco

Some dangerous chemicals are also formed when tobacco leaves are processed.

Smokeless tobacco products like dip contain up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals and can cause serious health problems.

http://bit.ly/2lEpqqF
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Arsenic

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Involuntary Exposure to Tobacco Smoke: A Report of the Surgeon General. Secondhand Smoke: What It Means To You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2006.

    0043, 0207, 0104, 0208, 0210

Dangerous Chemicals In All Tobacco Products

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1988. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

    0031, 0005, 0006, 0054

Dip Contains Up to 30 Cancer-Causing Chemicals

Formaldehyde

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010.

    0014, 0016, 0097

Lead

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). A Report of the Surgeon General: How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease: What It Means to You (Consumer Booklet). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010.

    0014, 0016, 0097

No Safe Tobacco

  • Cancer Research UK. Source of the chemicals in cigarettes. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-info/healthyliving/smokingandtobacco/whatsinacigarette/wheredothesechemicalscomefrom. Updated 2009. Accessed August 18, 2014.

    0081, 0078
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

  • National Cancer Institute (NCI), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. NIH Publication No. 14-7983; 2014. http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/brp/tcrb/global-perspective/SmokelessTobaccoAndPublicHealth.pdf

    0037
  • Secretan B, Straif K, Baan R, et al. A review of human carcinogens—Part E: tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salted fish. The Lancet Oncology. 2009; 10(11): 1033-1034.

    0036, 0037
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

    0031, 0005, 0006, 0054

Pounds

QUIZ: Dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals

QUIZ: If you start dipping as a teen, in 10 years you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your body weight

What's in a pinch?

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. NIH Publication No. 14-7983; 2014.

Yeast, Mold, and Bacteria