Tobacco Basics

What Counts As Tobacco?

There's no safe tobacco, but what counts as tobacco? (slideshow featuring types of tobacco including Dip, Cigarette, Roll-Your-Own, and Hookah (Waterpipe)
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Cigarette
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Dip
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Hookah (Waterpipe)
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Cigar/Cigarillo
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E-cig
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And More
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Dip - Tobacco Basics Quiz

Congrats - Quiz

CONGRATS!

You've completed all the quiz questions.

How'd you do? If you're trying to make up your mind about tobacco, it's good to know the facts.

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> Body Weight

If you start dipping when you're a teenager, in 10 years, you'll have dipped about as much tobacco as your body weight. (Image of boy standing next to large pile of tobacco)
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The Danger Of Dip

THE DANGER OF DIP

Smokeless tobacco may serve as a starter product for nicotine addiction among young people in the U.S. which could lead to nicotine dependence.

Any smokeless tobacco use can be harmful – there is no safe level. Smokeless tobacco users can experience health consequences at any age – even as teens. |page|

THE DANGER OF DIP

Dip contains nicotine. Nicotine exposure as a teen can cause long-term changes in brain structure and activity that remain after exposure to nicotine has ended. These changes occur in parts of the brain responsible for addiction, learning, and memory.

Smokeless tobacco users continue to crave smokeless tobacco despite harmful consequences and tend to switch to products with higher nicotine levels.

> Dangerous Chemicals In All Tobacco Products

All tobacco products contain dangerous chemicals. Not just cigarettes
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Dangerous Chemicals In All Tobacco Products

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1988. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

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  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

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QUIZ: Dip contains up to 30 cancer-causing chemicals

QUIZ: If you start dipping as a teen, in 10 years you will have dipped about as much tobacco as your body weight

The Danger Of Dip

  • Cancer Research UK. Source of the chemicals in cigarettes. http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/cancer-info/healthyliving/smokingandtobacco/whatsinacigarette/wheredothesechemicalscomefrom. Updated 2009. Accessed August 18, 2014.

    0081, 0078
  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC). Smokeless Tobacco and Some Tobacco-Specific N-Nitrosamines. Lyon, France. World Health Organization, International Agency for Research on Cancer; 2007.

  • National Cancer Institute (NCI), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. NIH Publication No. 14-7983; 2014. http://cancercontrol.cancer.gov/brp/tcrb/global-perspective/SmokelessTobaccoAndPublicHealth.pdf

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  • Secretan B, Straif K, Baan R, et al. A review of human carcinogens—Part E: tobacco, areca nut, alcohol, coal smoke, and salted fish. The Lancet Oncology. 2009; 10(11): 1033-1034.

    0036, 0037
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

    0031, 0005, 0006, 0054
  • National Cancer Institute (NCI), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Smokeless Tobacco and Public Health: A Global Perspective. Bethesda, MD: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and National Institutes of Health, National Cancer Institute. NIH Publication No. 14-7983; 2014.

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Federal Register. 2012; 77(64): 20034-20037.

  • TF0305- Martin GC, Brown JP, Eifler CW, Houston GD. Oral leukoplakia status six weeks after cessation of smokeless tobacco use. Journal of the American Dental Association. 1999; 130(7):945-54.

  • TF0474. Ehlinger DG, Bergstrom HC, Burke JC, Fernandez GM, McDonald CG, Smith RF. Adolescent nicotine-induced dendrite remodeling in the nucleus accumbens is rapid, persistent, and D1-dopamine receptor dependent. Brain Struct Funct. 2016; 221(1):133-145.

  • McDonald CG, Eppolito AK, Brielmaier JM, et al. Evidence for elevated nicotine-induced structural plasticity in nucleus accumbens of adolescent rats. Brain Res. 2007; 1151:211-218.

  • Smith RF, McDonald CG, Bergstrom HC, Ehlinger DG, Brielmaier JM. Adolescent nicotine induces persisting changes in development of neural connectivity. Neurosci Biobehav Rev. 2015; 55:432-443.

  • Xu Z, Seidler FJ, Tate CA, Garcia SJ, Slikker W Jr, Slotkin TA. Sex-selective hippocampal alterations after adolescent nicotine administration: effects on neurospecific proteins. Nicotine Tob Res. 2003; 5(6):955-960.

  • Bergstrom HC, Smith RF, Mollinedo NS, McDonald CG. Chronic nicotine exposure produces lateralized, age-dependent dendritic remodeling in the rodent basolateral amygdala. Synapse. 2010; 64(10):754-764.

  • Lee H, Kang MS, Chung JM, Noh J. Repeated nicotine exposure in adolescent rats: Reduction of medial habenular activity and augmentation of nicotine preference. Physiol Behav. 2015; 138:345-350.

  • Adermark L, Morud J, Lotfi A, Jonsson S, Soderpalm B, Ericson M. Age-contingent influence over accumbal neurotransmission and the locomotor stimulatory response to acute and repeated administration of nicotine in Wistar rats. Neuropharmacology. 2015; 97:104-112.

What Counts As Tobacco?

  • Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Harmful and potentially harmful constituents in tobacco products and tobacco smoke: established list. Silver Spring, MD: Federal Register; 2012. 77(64). https://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-03/pdf/2012-7766.pdf. Accessed August 21, 2017.

    0031, 0281, 0282
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 1988. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). How Tobacco Smoke Causes Disease. The Biology and Behavioral Basis for Smoking-Attributable Disease (Executive Summary). Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2010. 

    0031
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (USDHHS). The Health Consequences of Smoking - 50 Years of Progress. A Report of the Surgeon General. Atlanta, GA: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion, Office on Smoking and Health; 2014. 

    0031, 0005, 0006, 0054